Bilingual Support

From today my blog supports more than a language, English and Italian.

The reason behind this addition is that I felt a bit uncomfortable writing only in English some posts that I would like to be read also in my language, to support the diffusion of technologies and ideas that I think about as important in the country were I live and work.

The preferred language can be choosen selecting it in the top right of the home page. I added the multilingual support to WordPress installing the qTranslate plugin, very well done even if it has some small defects.

So have a good reading!

Ratings!

Recently I noted that I do not have a lot of comments on my blog (around 60 on 120 posts from 2003) but anyway I would like to some more feedback, so I installed the very-well-done plugin WP-PostRatings: now even my lazier reader can rate any post or page with only one click! 😉

Remember: in general, who writes does it because likes it (and likes also having some form of reward), but he/she cannot do better without your help so, if you like some post in some blog, please invest some minutes and do comment it!

A Case of Architectural Refactoring

Some weeks ago one of my customers decided that one of its biggest ASP.NET web intranet projects needed a sort of architectural revision, mainly to support better its customers with built-in fault tolerance but also to unchain development of the various sub-projects through better separation between software modules.

Continue reading A Case of Architectural Refactoring

Welcome to James Kerr

I welcome James Kerr, a friend of mine and a colleague, on my blog: he’ll write about requirements engineering and systems analysis, i.e. about everything that should be done before starting to write code (in the agile world, too, even if with less rigidity).

It is my hope that more of my friends will follow James and together we can create a place where people can discuss software development problems, and find some good solutions.

Clouds Evolve: Dealing with Infrastructure Complexity

As expected, at least by me, Amazon EC2 is evolving in a more “concrete” platform good for web hosting; in fact, some time ago I received a mail from AWS announcing two new features: Elastic IP Addresses and Availability Zones (you read for sure the news also on Slashdot: Amazon EC2 Now More Ready for Application Hosting, isn’t it?)

Continue reading Clouds Evolve: Dealing with Infrastructure Complexity

Amazon EC2 will get persistent storage

Only a small note to let you know that Amazon is hearing us and added a new feature to EC2: persistent storage.

As a subscriber of AWS services yesterday I received an email in which Amazon announces that we “will be able to create volumes ranging in size from 1 GB to 1 TB, and will be able to attach multiple volumes to a single instance. Volumes are designed for high throughput, low latency access from Amazon EC2, and can be attached to any running EC2 instance where they will show up as a device inside of the instance…“.

The mail ends saying that the new functionality “will be publicly available later this year” and offers a link to request to join the private beta program; I subscribed it and will let you now as soon as I’ll put my hands on it.

More on the [Computing] Clouds

Recently I stumbled upon a couple of articles1,2 and, remembering my experience with EC2, I discovered that utility computing was not what I was searching for: I was searching for something that helped me without adding complexity, but I was not happy with simple web hosting offers, I wanted also complete control over my infrastructure to have the technical freedom that I could need and because, when I think about my customers’ data, I trust no one.

Continue reading More on the [Computing] Clouds

Helping Improve Virtualmin

Only a small note to let you know that Virtualmin (from version 3.54) can be used for serious work when importing websites from Plesk backups: I tried the previous version with some web sites but it was too buggy, so I decided to help authors in debugging and testing it; I think that now Virtualmin can import the backups in a rather complete way.

BTW, Plesk is a good product, full of features, but I prefer Webmin/Virtualmin because they let me have full control of the server, instead of the way of Plesk that is too automatic in my opinion and offers less choices, impositions that I feel too strong (one for all: Plesk comes and works only with QMail).